Sue's Success Story

When I first got diagnosed with Asherman's, I got online and read as much as I could. I didn't know how severe my case was, and after doing some reading, I was terrified.

Like so many others, my Asherman's developed as a result of a D&C after placenta accreta. I was lucky in that it got diagnosed quickly after symptoms developed. My cycle started about 10 months after my baby was born, resulting in severe cyclic pain but no bleeding. I had to go through a few cycles before I recognized the cyclic pattern, and then went to my OB. After a sono hystogram, where very little saline made it inside, I got the diagnosis. At this point, I knew nothing about severity. I assumed the worst, thinking the whole uterus was sealed shut. Later, I understood that the location of the scarring, rather than its extent, was the issue. At this point, my OB was talking to me about surrogacy, and I was despondent.

After much anguish, I decided to pay out of pocket to see an A-lister. At the consultation, he did an ultrasound. While the extent of the scarring cannot be ascertained via ultrasound, he could see healthy endometrium. My cervix was blocked, but there was also scarring blocking one of my tubes. He was very optimistic; it really pays to see someone who has dealt with tons of similar cases.

I scheduled an in-office procedure within a few weeks, so I did not have to live with this much longer. During the procedure, he could finally ascertain the severity; it turns out I had a very mild case. 95% of my uterus is scar-free. The tube may or may not have been cleared. He did follow-ups (where he broke up any forming scars by quickly inserting a probe, but did not use a hysteroscope). He felt it was so mild, that he did not need to do a follow-up hysteroscopy. I did not need estrogen, since most of my lining was healthy. A few weeks later, I had my first period, and it was totally normal!

As for fertility, he felt I should have no issues. He did not even feel that my next pregnancy would be particularly high-risk (contrary to what my current OB was saying). I still worry about a recurrence of placenta accreta, and will seek out a high-risk OB (especially now that I know bad things can happen!), but I feel much relieved.

I hope this story helps some of you who have just been diagnosed, and are assuming the worst. It might not be as long a road as you fear, and the right doctor can guide you down it much more quickly.

Sue

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